Menu
BCA on Facebook BCA on Twitter

curriculum description 

Pre-K3/4 Curriculum

Pre-K3 and Pre-K4 Curriculum

Belvoir Christian Academy’s Pre-K3 and Pre-K4 teachers use the “Pocket of Pre-school” curriculum. BCA, along with the creators of the curriculum, believes that children learn best through play and experiences, by doing, getting messy, investigating their questions and problem-solving with their friends. They learn by playing games, using their imagination, expressing their emotions, creating and exploring the world around them. 

Religion/Christian Faith: Learning to love Jesus as our Lord and Savior is the main focus of our curriculum. This is accomplished through the singing, teaching Bible stories and daily prayer. Our pre-school mission statement is to Love God, love one another and be kind. 

“Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.” Mark 12:30-31

Language and Literacy: 
Student will learn to recognize name and all letters in own name
Working on writing name
Experiment with letter form
Name upper and lower case letters, beginning sounds and rhymes
Follow two-step directions
Builds up to multiple-step directions. 
Retell a story 
Scans page of print left to right
Understands that pictures, print, environmental print, and other symbols carry meaning
Chooses independently to read or pretend to read books

Mathematics: 
Recognition of shapes and numbers
Spatial relationships
Sorting
Equal parts
Patterns
Calendar/Money/Measuring
Comparisons/Same/Different
Counts accurately up to 10 objects or people in a line
Begins adding/subtracting to solve problems
Indicates the position of objects or people in a line
Anchor charts and graphing

Science: 
Make predictions
Performs simple investigations
Observes, describes, explores, materials and events in the environment
Understands parts of a plant and how things grow
Identifies and uses simple tools
Demonstrates and explains the safe and proper use of tools, equipment and materials
Makes comparisons
Phases of the moon and space, rocks and minerals, and insects and butterflies

Art: We encourage our children to reflect their individuality through art. Children experiment with mixed media to develop their fine motor skills by painting with marbles, Q-tips, magnets, items from nature and more. 

Music: Children sing and listen to a variety of songs that have repetitive phrases and rhythmic patterns.

Physical Education: Physical education focuses on developing their gross motor skills such as running, dancing, throwing, jumping and balancing. Students play interactive games, do cosmic yoga and have “dance parties” in the school’s gym. 

Centers
Each day during the school year (Aug. - May, 8:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.), Pre-K3 and Pre-K4 students rotate through a variety of “Centers” based on the concepts created by “Dr. Jean” from Pocket of Pre-School. 

Pretend/Dramatic Play: “It looks like I’m playing, but I’m developing social skills, emotional skills, independence, oral language, my imagination, responsibility and the executive function. I may use these skills as a mother, father, safety officer or politician one day.” - Dr. Jean 

Discovery: “It looks like I’m playing, but I’m developing a curiosity about the world, sensory skills, problem- solving, language skills and experience with the scientific process (observing, predicting, experimenting, recording, reporting). If I’m a doctor, lab technician, pharmacist or landscaper, I will utilize these skills.” - Dr. Jean 

Writing: “It looks like I’m playing, but I’m developing eye-hand coordination, small motor skills, alphabet knowledge, self-confidence, vocabulary and an interest in print. I might use these skills one day as a journalist, administrative assistant or poet.” - Dr. Jean 

Building Blocks: “It looks like I’m playing, but I’m developing motor skills, math concepts (number, size, shape, space), oral language, social skills. eye-hand coordination, self-control and my imagination. I may be a builder or architect when I’m grown.” - Dr. Jean 

Art: “It looks like I’m playing, but I’m developing my creativity, small motor skills, problem solving, sharing, cooperation, independence and responsibility. I may use these skills as an artist, illustrator or designer one day.” - Dr. Jean 

Reading/Library time: “It looks like I’m playing, but I’m developing alphabet knowledge, oral language, print knowledge, listening skills, hand-eye coordination, concepts about the world and the desire to read. Maybe I’ll be a publisher, author or librarian when I grow up.” - Dr. Jean 

“Almost all creativity involves purposeful play.” - Abraham Maslow 
“If you can dream it, you can do it.” - Walt Disney 
“A person’s a person, no matter how small.” - Dr. Seuss

Kindergarten 

Religion/Christian Faith:  Each week the kindergarten class learns about God’s word through learning Bible stories presented by our Concordia Religion curriculum. Students learn Bible verses, songs, and prayers. This is a special time in our class where we connect with one another and spend time with God. 

Language Arts: The kindergarten class uses a teacher-created curriculum by Tara West. This curriculum covers language usage, grammar, phonics, guided reading, and so much more. Our students are exposed to a print-rich environment that helps to build their literacy skills regardless of subject matter. Students work and learn in whole group collaborative lessons and small group instruction throughout the school day. Every student spends time working on phonemic awareness, guided writing, small group reading instruction, and handwriting. The students are constantly engaged and being challenged to work harder, think outside of the box and to do their very best. 

Mathematics: At the kindergarten level, students work hard daily to build a solid foundation for mathematical concepts and applications. Students work as a whole group developing number sense with the teacher each day. They continue building their number sense skills working in collaborative groups. We teach lessons to both whole group and small groups. Students in class spend time daily working through several math center rotations one of which is working in a small group with the teacher for closely monitored instruction and assessment. Your kindergarten student will learn addition, subtraction, money values, time to the hour, counting on and back, 2D and 3D shapes, measurement, sorting and classifying, comparing, greater and less than, and numbers to 100. We also spend time incorporating literacy into our math program as well by introducing new math vocabulary weekly and including read aloud books that tie into the skill(s) we are working on. This opens the door for students to see that reading and math truly are everywhere.

Social Studies: The class spends time throughout the school year learning about various aspects of the United States, rules, community helpers, maps, cultures and economics. 

Science: The students will work through five units of study through the course of the school year. The class spends time learning about Life Science, Earth Science, Physical Science, Space and Simple Machines, and the Five Senses. Students do a variety of hands-on and research work within the science curriculum.

Physical Education:  Kindergarten has gym class twice a week for 45 minutes. During this time, they work on large/gross motor skills, sports skills, how to work as a team, and healthy living practices.

Health: Kindergarten spends time learning about; I Can Be Me; I Can Be Safe; I Can Be Clean; I Can Be Fit, and I Can Be Healthy. The goal of our health curriculum is to provide our students with the knowledge and skills they need to be healthy and safe citizens.

Art: Art is incorporated in all subject areas within kindergarten. We learn the importance of drawing and coloring that makes sense to illustrate our writing in language arts. Art is used to depict word problems in our math studies. Of course, we also find time to explore a variety of art for fun as well. We love to get messy and creative!

First Grade

Religion/Christian Faith: Students are focused on the Bible, learning the familiar stories and the lessons taken from them in the One in Christ curriculum as well as memorizing different passages throughout the year, starting with I Corinthians 13:4-7 over numerous weeks to use as our base.

Reading: In first grade there is an emphasis on a mixture of phonics, sight words, vocabulary building, comprehension, and reading for other interests. Many different strategies are taught in helping the student become independent readers, including context clues, a word wall, phonics, similarity, and other. We encourage mentors by having a “buddy reading” system with Kindergarten through fourth grades. We follow the Guided Reading system of assessment which allows each student to work at their own pace, showing their individual strengths and areas of concerns.

Language Arts: Students go over basic grammar concepts such as sentence structure, nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, punctuation, capitalization and more.  This is reinforced by our writing center where we learn to write letters, opinions and more.

Spelling: Starting with simple short vowel words, the curriculum teaches many different phonic combinations including long and short vowel sounds, consonant blends, using y for /e/ and /i/, compound words and others.

Handwriting: While reinforcing regular print, students also learn the D’Nealian form of writing, including spacing, slant, proportion and upper/lower case. This is a step toward learning cursive when they enter third grade.

Mathematics: Teachers employ the use of multiple curricula, as well as math centers to reinforce our lessons. Our lessons cover addition and subtraction from 10 to 20, shapes and patterns, measurement, counting and adding money, problem solving, basic fractions, place value, telling time to the quarter hour and more.

Social Studies: Students are introduced to some of the basic foundations of the social sciences: geography, where we live from home to world, natural resources, landforms, map skills, citizenship, economics and careers and American history.

Science: Students explore how plants grow; how animals progress from baby to adult; causes and indications of weather changes; matter: its physical characteristics; and each of the five senses.

Computer: Students work on basic computer skills such as computer protocol, logging in and basic keyboarding. They also are introduced to coding through an online enrichment course.

STEM: STEM is the integration (not the regular practice) of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math in an active environment that focuses on student-centered learning. Students are engaged in discovering problems, questioning, problem solving, collaborating, and hands on activities while they face real world issues.  Students are encouraged to approach the problem based upon their previous learning. Everyone’s voice matters, all ideas matter and are discussed and attempted. Students evaluate their approach and solution throughout the STEM activity and improve their design as they build and experiment.  Teachers are facilitators of thinking and guide students through the problem solving experience.

Spanish: Spanish for the elementary school student focuses on learning greetings, the names of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes, household items, and calendar-related subjects. The focus is on correct pronunciation and conversational skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study. 

Music: Students learn how to demonstrate and identify musical contrasts; demonstrate steady beat through movement, singing, and playing instruments; identify all the families of orchestral instruments and play a variety of classroom percussion instruments.

Physical Education: Students work on gross motor skill and large movement.  Sports skills, how to work as a team, and healthy living practices and other skills are covered.

Art: The students use art to show word problems during math, as well as depict their conception of a story during reading and language arts. They also have their own art journal in which they regularly create their masterpieces!

Second Grade

Religion/Christian Faith: Second graders use the One in Christ curriculum from Concordia Publishing House. The program insures that children learn about God’s plan of love and salvation for His people. Students also create a Promise Journal which includes their prayers, prayers of others, answered prayers, as well as Bible verses that they have memorized.  

Reading: Second graders use a Daily 3-structure during reading block. This allows for the reading program to be individualized so that each student receives time in a small group with the teacher daily to focus on individual needs and targeted skills.  The time is broken down into whole class mini-lessons and small group centers as well as small group time with the teacher. During whole class mini lessons, skills are introduced and explained through videos, read-alouds, posters, etc. The various skills introduced are comprehension, vocabulary, spelling and grammar, and each week they focus on a specific read-aloud. We use Fountas and Pinnell reading style for assessments and small group time. 

Writing: Writing units encourage students to become authors who find a love for writing. During our reading block, students complete the work in writing centers which allow them to freely write and brainstorm their own ideas. They are given many resources to complete different types of writings such as stories, poems, post cards, cards, recipes, etc.  Writing is utilized in all subjects daily. Second graders work together to brainstorm, write, revise, edit and finally publish a class book - they get to become published authors!  

Spelling: Students work on a particular phonetic rule each week. During word work time, students complete hands-on activities to practice their words. Weekly spelling tests give students the opportunity to learn phonics rules as well as rule breakers.  Words are grouped in a way that makes sense and students become better spellers and readers.

Grammar: Grammar is taught during our reading block. Skills are introduced in various ways such as videos, class posters, etc. Students practice these skills in hands-on ways and keep their work in their interactive notebook which allows them to review previously learned topics. Students learn the different parts of a sentence and how to correctly form them to use in their writing. 

Mathematics: Second graders use a Guided Math approach which is when new skills are taught daily in a small group setting. One group meets with the teacher for a hands-on activity pertaining to the new skill, while another group plays a game that reviews skills from the previous unit. The third group is practicing the new skill on their own in their math journal. This approach is very hands-on and individualized.  Students are given a pre-assessment before each unit to see what they know and what they need to learn. They are given a post assessment to ensure that they understand the skills at the end of each unit.  

Science: Science is taught using the Christian Schools International Science textbook. Students also learn through hands-on activities which engage students and assist them by learning through discovery. Some of the topics that students investigate during second grade are bones and muscles, health and safety, animals, matter, position and motion. We also integrate science into the reading units.
Social Studies:  Second graders explore democracy, government, historical figures, geography, culture and economics. Students are engaged with hands-on activities, projects and reflection writings. We also integrate social studies into reading units.

STEM: STEM is the integration (not singular practice) of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math in an active environment that focuses on student-centered learning. Students are engaged in discovering problems, questioning, problem-solving, collaborating and hands-on activities while they face real world issues.  Students are encouraged to approach the problem based upon their previous learning. Everyone’s voice matters. All ideas matter and are discussed and attempted. Students evaluate their approach and solution throughout the STEM activity and improve their design as they build and experiment. Teachers are facilitators of thinking and guide students through the problem-solving experience. 

Computer: Students work on basic computer skills such as computer protocol, logging in and basic keyboarding. They also are introduced to coding through an online enrichment course.

Spanish: Spanish for the elementary school student focuses on learning greetings, the names of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes, household items, and calendar-related subjects. The focus is on correct pronunciation and conversational skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study. 

Physical Education: Students work on large/gross motor skills, sports skills, how to work as a team and healthy living practices.

Music:
Students learn how to demonstrate and identify musical contrasts; demonstrate steady beat through movement, singing and playing instruments; identify all the families of orchestral instruments and are introduced to a variety of classroom percussion instruments, with time to explore and play the instruments.

Art: Art is incorporated in all subject areas within second grade. Students learn the importance of drawing and coloring that make sense to illustrate their writing in language arts just like illustrators do in the books that they work with. Art is used to depict word problems in our math studies.  We also find time to explore a variety of art for fun as well. We do love to get messy and creative!

Educational Experiences:
Students in second grade participate in our Reading Buddies program with Kindergarten through fourth grade. This is a time when these classes meet together to read and enjoy books. Students are assigned to groups with students from the other grades so they may learn from others as well as help others.  Students also participate in our annual “Mini Course” program for the first time. “Mini Courses” are for second, third and fourth graders. They may choose to take part in the weekly hour-ling class over four weeks on a special topic such as cycling, baking, cooking, art, crafting, word-working, rhythm, sports, board games, gardening, etc. Throughout the year, students may also participate in a few field trips. In the past, we have traveled to the Mayfield Dairy Farm, the theater to see movies pertaining to the lessons we have learned in class as well as Coolidge Park and a local pumpkin patch during the fall. Students also participate in collaborative learning experiences with many different classes in the school.

Third Grade 

Religion/Christian Faith: Third graders use the One in Christ curriculum by Concordia Publishing House, which incorporates nine units that coincide with the church season.  Bibles are used on a daily basis. Each unit incorporates daily devotions, focus Bible verses, skits and opportunities for artistic expression.  

Memory Work: Students are required to recite or write one memory work assignment per week. Memory work selections include, but are not limited to, Bible verses, books of the Bible, the Ten Commandments with meanings, the Lord’s Prayer and the Lutheran Church Creeds.

Reading: The Reading Street curriculum is used within Reading, Spelling and English to constantly reinforce the learning process. Students also use the “Daily 5”* to foster independence, build good study habits, become informed and effective readers and apply what they read to real life. Students have individualized or small group instruction on their reading level to progress at each step, and texts vary throughout the year.

Spelling: Students review their spelling words through writing, drawing, and hands-on activities in Daily 5. Students are tested and complete pages to reinforce their spelling words each week.

English: Students learn proper sentence structure and the role of words in a sentence. Lessons are done in a mixture of whole group and small group instruction.

Writing: Writing is incorporated into many of the subjects, and creative writing is often a part of Daily 5. Cursive writing is practiced and mastered by the end of the year. Near the end of the school year, students collaborate, write and create a class book that is published.

Mathematics: The Saxon curriculum incorporates learning in increments with practice in between. It is built on prior learning without isolated units. Students complete timed math facts and master multiplication facts to 12.
Science: Students use the curriculum by Christian Schools International which focuses on the relationship of science and a biblical perspective. Students engage in lab and group work on a regular basis. Units in the curriculum include Scientific Investigations, Circulatory & Respiratory Systems, Plants, Forces & Electricity, Soil, Natural Resources and Structures. 

Science: Students use the curriculum by Christian Schools International which focuses on the relationship of science and a biblical perspective. Students engage in lab and group work on a regular basis. Units in the curriculum include Scientific Investigations, Circulatory & Respiratory Systems, Plants, Forces & Electricity, Soil, Natural Resources and Structures. 

Social Studies: Students learn about communities in the United States and around the world. The “Communities” textbook includes units on “Living in a Community”, “Communities of the Past”, “Our Government”, “Changes within a Community” and “Working Together in a Community”. Students also study a unit on geography as they learn about our country’s states and capitals. Third graders begin the year with a community project and end the year by writing their first research paper on the community of Chattanooga. Each year, students look forward to taking a local field trip to discover our own community, tour City Hall and meet the city’s mayor.  

Current Events: Students learn about our nation and world through reading Scholastic News together. We debate topics, discuss decisions and learn about interesting social and scientific changes in our world.
Art: Students enjoy art once a week, and use a variety of media. Each year, students are given the opportunity to showcase their art at a school-wide arts night.

Music: Students learn how to sing in two parts; apply knowledge of dynamics, tempo,= and mode; identify pitch (including accidentals) using treble and bass clef, the keyboard, and solfege syllables and hand signs interchangeably; identify complex and syncopated rhythms using time signatures and standard rhythmic notation (notes and rests); further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents’ Day programs.

Physical Education:
Basic motor skills; running, jumping, kicking, catching, throwing are used in combination with aerobic activities and lead-up games. Team games and sports are part of the curriculum.

Spanish: Students learn greetings, the name of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes and calendar-related items. There is a focus in learning about history and culture of Spanish speaking people through activities that introduce different foods, festivals and traditions, with increased focus on correct pronunciation, vocabulary development, conversational and reading skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study.

Educational Experiences: 
A) Students in second - fourth grade participate in mini-course classes each Friday in February.  Students are able to learn about topics and hobbies outside of the normal curriculum such as archery, baking, dance, woodworking and more.
B) Third graders partake in a living history museum every other year. This is a great opportunity for our students to research a historical figure, create a narrative and costume and give a presentation to a large number of people.
C) Field trips vary each year, but have included Old McDonald’s Farm, Coolidge Park, the Bessie Smith Cultural Center, Raccoon Mountain, Lookout Mountain and City Hall.

*The “Daily 5” is a five-step rotation within a daily time period that includes:
Reading to self
Reading to someone
Listening to reading
Working on writing
Word work
(An integral part of the “Daily 5” is the small group meeting time with the teacher.)

Fourth Grade

Religion/Christian Faith: Students in fourth grade use the One in Christ curriculum by Concordia Publishing House. Nine units are used in the curriculum to coincide with the church season. Bibles are used on a daily basis. Each unit incorporates daily devotions, focus Bible verses, along with skits and opportunities for artistic expression.  

Memory Work: Students are required to recite or write one memory work assignment a week. Memory work selections include, but are not limited to, Bible verses, books of the Bible, the Ten Commandments with meanings, the Lord’s Prayer and Creeds.

Reading: Units of study include: listening skills, fantasy/reality, non-fiction, realistic fiction, biography, poetry, folk tales, cartoons and informational articles. Students discuss concepts related to vocabulary, comprehension, sequence, main ideas/details, cause and effect, summary, fact/opinion, figurative language, analogies and prefixes/suffixes. Literature units may include: Seven Kisses in a Row, Mouse and the Motorcycle, Mr. Popper’s Penguin, Stone Fox, Despereaux, Nim’s Island and Maniac McGee.

English: Students learn proper sentence structure and the role of words in a sentence. Key concepts include nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, punctuation, capitalization and more. Lessons are conducted in a combination of whole group and small group instruction. 

Writing: Creative writing is incorporated into many of the subjects. Near the end of the school year, each student brainstorms, writes and creates an individual book that is published.

Mathematics: The Saxon curriculum is an integrated math program that provides review, practice, and assessment of concepts. Units include Numbers and Operations, Algebraic Concepts, Geometry, Measurement, Analysis and Probability, Problem Solving, Money, Estimation, Fractions and Decimals.

Science: Students use the curriculum by Christian Schools International which focuses on the relationship of science and a biblical perspective. Students engage in lab and group work on a regular basis. Units in the curriculum include Scientific Investigations, Organ Systems, Living Things, Light, Sound and Minerals/Rocks. 

Social Studies: Students complete a time-line history of the United States starting with early Americans, explorers, settlements, the Revolutionary War, Constitution, early years of the Republic, the War of 1812, Slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction, Modern America, WWI and WWII and the challenges America faces in the 21st Century.  
Current Events: Students learn about our nation and world through reading Scholastic News. We debate topics, discuss decisions and learn about interesting social and scientific changes in our world.

Art: Students have art once per week, and use a variety of media. Each spring, students are given the opportunity to showcase their art at a school-wide arts night.

Music: Students learn how to sing in two parts; apply knowledge of dynamics, tempo, and mode; identify pitch (including accidentals) using treble and bass clef, the keyboard, and solfege syllables and hand signs interchangeably; identify complex and syncopated rhythms using time signatures and standard rhythmic notation (notes and rests); further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents’ Day programs.

Physical Education: Basic motor skills; running, jumping, kicking, catching and throwing are used in combination with aerobic activities and lead-up games. Team games and sports are part of the curriculum.

Spanish: Students are learning greetings, the name of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes and calendar-related items. There is a focus in learning about history and culture of Spanish speaking people through activities that introduce different food, festivals and traditions, with increased focus on correct pronunciation, vocabulary development, conversational and reading skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study.

Educational Experiences: 
A) Students in 2nd- 4th grade participate in mini-course classes on Friday afternoons each February. Students are able to learn about topics and hobbies outside of the normal curriculum such as archery, baking, dance, woodworking, and more.
B) Fourth graders partake in a living history museum biennially. This is a great opportunity for students to research an historical figure, create a narrative and costume and give a presentation to a large number of people.
C) Each year, the fourth grade class participates in a 3-day, 2-night field trip to River Ridge environmental learning facility. The students engage in outdoor learning, team-building, faith enrichment and more.  

Fifth Grade 

Religion/Christian Faith: Fifth grade uses the One in Christ curriculum from Concordia Publishing House. Each day begins with time with Jesus and the study of God’s word. Class work connects God’s word to each student’s life and relates the stories to Jesus. There are weekly Bible verses to memorize. Each lesson begins with a question that is answered with the word of God. Units include: God the Father, Jesus, the Holy Spirit, Salvation, Prayer, Worship, the Commandments and Witnessing.

Mathematics: Saxon Math’s sequential program uses daily repetition to review, and introduces new applications for all mathematical concepts. It includes practice and assessment of learned concepts. Concepts include Numbers and Operations, Algebraic concepts, Geometry, Measurement, Analysis and Probability, Problem Solving, Money, Estimation, Percents, Fractions and Decimals.

Reading: Students discuss concepts related to vocabulary skills and comprehension skills. Students develop an appreciation and enjoyment for literature as they learn to distinguish and respond to various literary genres. They will learn how to use the reading strategies: make connections, ask questions, make predictions, and visualize as they read. Literature units may include the following works: Wonder, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library, James and the Giant Peach. They will learn to take on ownership of their reading by participating in Literature Circles. Accelerated Reading (AR) testing is used to gauge comprehension of independent reading.

Language Arts: Students will demonstrate knowledge of Standard English usage, mechanics and spelling. Through writing practice, correct sentence structure and paragraph formation will be utilized. Weekly spelling lessons are given, and students are assessed on words that coincide with reading. Grammar lessons that build on knowledge of key concepts in grammar (nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases and modifiers, punctuation and capitalization) are practiced daily.

Writing: Writing is an essential communication tool from pre-writing to publishing. The six traits of writing: ideas and content, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency and conventions will be used. Students will write expressively, in response to literature, in a variety of modes and genres, and locate and analyze information to prepare written work and presentations.

Science: Earth science, life science and physical science experienced through real-world experiences, field trips, hands-on experiences and cooperative learning.

Social Studies: The year is spent doing a time-line history of the United States from ancient Americans, explorers, early settlements, the Revolutionary War, the Constitution,   early years of the Republic, War of 1812, development of North and South as distinct regions, conflict over the question of slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction, emergence of modern America, World Wars I and II, and challenges for America as the 21st Century begins.

Art: Projects focus on the elements of art – color, line, texture, shape, space and value. A variety of mediums will be used for a number of projects that will include drawing the human face in perspective.

Physical Education: Basic motor skills; running, jumping, kicking, catching and throwing are used in combination with aerobic activities and lead up games. Team games and sports are part of the curriculum.

Technology: Educational software, curriculum-inspired activities and educational games are used. Students continue to improve in accuracy and speed as they keyboard and use the word processor. Students each have a Chromebook available to use at school and some assignments are done on Google slides and docs. IPads/tablets are also used.

Spanish: Students learn greetings, the name of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes and calendar-related items. There is a focus in learning about history and culture of Spanish-speaking people through activities that introduce different food, festivals and traditions, with increased focus on correct pronunciation, vocabulary development, conversational and reading skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study.

Music: Students learn how to sing in two parts; apply knowledge of dynamics, tempo, and mode; identify pitch (including accidentals) using treble and bass clef, the keyboard, and solfege syllables and hand signs interchangeably; identify complex and syncopated rhythms using time signatures and standard rhythmic notation (notes and rests); further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents’ Day programs.

Sixth Grade

Religion/Christian Faith: Sixth through eighth grade students are taught religion using a three-year rotation. In the first year, students study the Old Testament and how the coming of Jesus was foretold and announced. The second year is the study of the New Testament of the Bible and how Jesus Christ is the completion of the promise of a Savior and the beginning of the Christian church. The third year, students go through the six chief parts of Martin Luther’s Small Catechism and learn how Christians should live lives of service and evangelism to Jesus.

Literature: Students develop reading and listening skills necessary for comprehension, interpretation, analysis, evaluation and appreciation of print and non-print text. With an emphasis on critical thinking, students develop empathy for others, form their own opinions, understand the interconnectedness of the world and develop skills to search for information independently. Materials used in class include: novels, short stories, read-aloud, discussions, written response, independent reading, plays, as well as video.

Language Arts: Studying and practicing grammar, punctuation and vocabulary gives students the tools needed to clearly express themselves in speaking and writing. Students learn and use the writing process to write, edit and publish expository, narrative and persuasive writing that is evaluated using the Six Traits* model allowing them to focus on their strength and growth areas. Students work on fluency in writing through daily journaling.  Most writing may be completed on a computer.

*The Six Traits of writing are Voice, Ideas, Presentation, Conventions, Organization, Word Choice, and Sentence Fluency. It creates a common vocabulary and guidelines for teachers to use with students so that they become familiar with the terms used in writing. It develops consistency from grade level to grade level.

Mathematics: The sixth grade Saxon math course is intended to provide a foundation for the pre-algebra/algebra progression. Students may progress to pre-algebra in seventh grade and algebra in eighth grade, or follow a sequence of sixth grade math, seventh grade math and eighth grade pre-algebra based on assessments throughout the sixth grade math year and an end-of-year assessment. The scope and sequence for sixth grade math follows a progression of topics divided into nine strands: numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, data analysis and probability, problem solving, communication, mathematical reasoning and making connections.

Social Studies: World history is taught through the use of lecture, hands-on student discovery (archaeological dig), technology, video clips, movie segments and projects.

Science: Units of study include ecology, ecosystems and conservation; astronomy, the solar system, stars and galaxies; electricity, and magnetism; waves, electromagnetic waves, sound and light.

Art: Just as we stand in awe of God’s creative power, it is the goal of art that each student learn to appreciate their own creativity. Projects using a variety of mediums encourage students to stretch their own ideas through visual representations in a positive environment. 

Physical Education: Team sports are taught through lead-up games and simplified rules of the sports that require gross motor skills. Soccer, football, basketball, volleyball, baseball, track and field and speedball are used to teach skills and fundamentals. 

Technology: Each student has access to a Chromebook assigned for use at school.  Students will learn to use the computer as a valuable tool. The main focus is on word processing, spreadsheets, databases and tying them all together. They will use proper keyboard skills. Students will also learn to use the computer to create a multimedia presentation. They will be taught research skills for proper browsing of the Internet. The goal is to create technically literate students.

Spanish: The Spanish curriculum in middle school provides support for the development of oral, written and reading comprehension, as well as introducing students to the history and culture of Spanish-speaking people. The emphasis is on using Spanish in a real context in conversation and genuine situations.  

Music: Students learn how to sing harmony in three or four parts; memorize key signatures in both the major and minor modes; aurally and visually identify basic harmonic progressions (I, IV, V); practice weekly and perform in a middle school handbell choir; identify and perform complex rhythms with and without the use of percussion instruments; further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents’ Day programs.

Seventh Grade

Religion/Christian Faith: Sixth through eighth grade students are taught religion using a three-year rotation. Year one is the study of the Old Testament and how the coming of Jesus was foretold and announced. The second year is the study of the New Testament of the Bible and how Jesus Christ is the completion of the promise of a Savior and the beginning of the Christian church. The third year, students study the six chief parts of Martin Luther’s Small Catechism and learn how Christians should live lives of service and evangelism to Jesus.

Literature: Students develop reading and listening skills necessary for comprehension, interpretation, analysis, evaluation and appreciation of print and non-print text. With an emphasis on critical thinking, students develop empathy for others, form their own opinions, understand the interconnectedness of the world and develop skills to search for information independently. Materials used in class include: novels, short stories, read-aloud, discussions, written response, independent reading, plays as well as video.

Language Arts: Studying and practicing grammar, punctuation and vocabulary gives students the tools needed to clearly express themselves in speaking and writing. Students learn and use the writing process to write, edit and publish expository, narrative and persuasive writing that is evaluated using the Six Traits model allowing them to focus on their strength and growth areas. Students work on fluency in writing through daily journaling. Most writing may be completed on a Google Chromebook.

Mathematics: Students are placed into a class based on the results of a placement test or the recommendation of the previous teacher. Seventh grade math students continue with basic concepts. Pre-Algebra students expand on basic skills and explore more complex algebraic concepts.  

Social Studies: World geography is taught in the seventh grade. The students will learn the five themes of geography (location, place, human/environment interaction, movement and region) and how they influence where people live and work in many different areas of the world. Students will learn to use maps to locate places throughout the world. Online streaming and exercises are also an integral part of the study of geography.

Science: The focus is on life science. Beginning with the classification of life (Taxonomy), students will cover all six kingdoms of life, from viruses and bacteria through human biology. Students are challenged to think critically and will learn through laboratory, group sessions, video presentation and textbooks to research information. Online streaming brings the outside world into the classroom.

Technology: Each student is assigned a Chromebook for use at school. Students will learn to use the computer as a valuable tool. The main focus is on word processing, spreadsheets, databases and tying them all together. They will use proper keyboarding skills. Students will also learn to use the computer to create a multimedia presentation. They will be taught research skills for proper internet browsing. 

Art: Just as we stand in awe of God’s creative power, it is the goal of art that each student learn to appreciate their own creativity. Projects using a variety of mediums encourage students to stretch their own ideas through visual representations in a positive environment. 

Physical Education: Team sports are taught through lead-up games and simplified rules of the sports that require gross motor skills. Soccer, football, basketball, volleyball, baseball, track and field and speedball are used to teach skills and fundamentals. 

Spanish: The Spanish curriculum in middle school provides support for the development of oral, written and reading comprehension, as well as introducing students to the history and culture of Spanish-speaking people. The emphasis is on using Spanish in a real context in conversation and genuine situations.  

Music: Students learn how to sing harmony in three or four parts; memorize key signatures in both the major and minor modes; aurally and visually identify basic harmonic progressions (I, IV, V); practice weekly and perform in a middle school handbell hhoir; identify and perform complex rhythms with and without the use of percussion instruments; further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents’ Day programs.

Eighth Grade 

Religion/Christian Faith: Sixth through eighth grade students are taught religion using a three-year rotation.  Year one is the study of the Old Testament and how the coming of Jesus was foretold and announced. The second year is the study of the New Testament of the Bible and how Jesus Christ is the completion of the promise of a Savior and the beginning of the Christian Church. The third year, students go through the six chief parts of Martin Luther’s Small Catechism and learn how Christians should live lives of service and evangelism to Jesus.
 
Literature: Students develop reading and listening skills necessary for comprehension, interpretation, analysis, evaluation and appreciation of print and non-print text.  With an emphasis on critical thinking, students develop empathy for others, form their own opinions, understand the interconnectedness of the world and develop skills to search for information independently. Materials used in class include: novels, short stories, read-aloud, discussions, written response, independent reading, plays as well as video.

Language Arts: Studying and practicing grammar, punctuation and vocabulary gives students the tools needed to clearly express themselves in speaking and writing. Students learn and use the writing process to write, edit and publish expository, narrative and persuasive writing that is evaluated using the Six Traits model allowing them to focus on their strength and growth areas. Students work on fluency in writing through daily journaling. Most writing may be completed on a Google Chromebook.

Mathematics: Students are placed into a class based on the results of a placement test or the recommendation of the previous teacher. Pre-Algebra students expand on basic concepts and explore more complex algebraic concepts. The Algebra I course is a year-long class that covers all the required algebra concepts that are necessary for a high school Algebra I class.
  
Social Studies: United States history is studied in eighth grade. This is a survey course from the coming of the European settlers in America through modern times.  The ideals of the Republic that is the United States and the foundations of our government are explored in detail. Original documents and online streaming are used to bring history to life and are the basis for students to answer document-based questions.   

Science: The focus is on physical science. Students are introduced to the composition and structure of matter. With that knowledge, students study how matter reacts and interacts. Forces, motion, machines and how different kinds of energy are used is a major component of the class. Students will use the periodic table of the elements in the study of physical science.

Technology: Each student is assigned a Chromebook for use at school. Students will learn to use the computer as a valuable tool. The main focus is on word processing, spreadsheets, databases and tying them all together. They will use proper keyboarding skills. Students will also learn to use the computer to create a multimedia presentation. They will be taught research skills for proper internet browsing.

Art: Just as we stand in awe of God’s creative power, it is the goal of art that each student learn to appreciate their own creativity. Projects using a variety of mediums encourage students to stretch their own ideas through visual representations in a positive environment. 

Physical Education:
Team sports are taught through lead-up games and simplified rules of the sports that require gross motor skills. Soccer, football, basketball, volleyball, baseball, track and field and speedball are used to teach skills and fundamentals. 

Spanish: The Spanish curriculum in middle school provides support for the development of oral, written, and reading comprehension, as well as introducing students to the history and culture of Spanish-speaking people. The emphasis is on using Spanish in a real context in conversation and genuine situations.  

Music: Students learn how to sing harmony in three or four parts; memorize key signatures in both the major and minor modes; aurally and visually identify basic harmonic progressions (I, IV, V); practice weekly and perform in a middle school handbell choir; identify and perform complex rhythms with and without the use of percussion instruments; further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents’ Day programs.


additional class curriculums

Each class attends Music class twice per week for 45 minutes. 

Kindergarten through Second Grade: Students learn how to demonstrate and identify musical contrasts; demonstrate steady beat through movement, singing, and playing instruments; identify all the families of orchestral instruments and play  a variety of classroom percussion instruments; develop healthy singing techniques and matching teacher pitch; identify basic rhythmic and pitch notation; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; listen to books and color pictures about music; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents' Day programs.

Third through Fifth Grade: Students learn how to sing in two parts; apply knowledge of dynamics, tempo, and mode; identify pitch (including accidentals) using treble and bass clef, the keyboard, and solfege syllables and hand signs interchangeably; identify complex and syncopated rhythms using time signatures and standard rhythmic notation (notes and rests); further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents' Day programs.

Sixth through Eighth Grade: Students learn how to sing harmony in three or four parts; memorize key signatures in both the major and minor modes; aurally and visually identify basic harmonic progressions (I, IV, V); practice weekly and perform in a Middle School Handbell Choir; identify and perform complex rhythms with and without the use of percussion instruments; further develop healthy singing techniques; sing chapel songs in class and in worship; listen to and identify a variety of musical styles; prepare choral music for the annual Christmas and Grandparents' Day programs.

Kindergarten - 8th graders attend Spanish class twice per week for 45 minutes. Pre-K1 - Pre-K4 students also receive Spanish instruction from Mrs. Gibbons twice per week within their classroom. 

Pre-K1 - Pre-K4: At the pre-school level, Mrs. Liz visits these classes to teach students numbers, colors and simple vocabulary words. 

Kindergarten through Second Grade: Spanish for the elementary school student focuses on learning greetings, the names of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes, household items, and calendar-related subjects. The focus is on correct pronunciation and conversational skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study. 

Third through Fifth Grade: Students learn greetings, the name of family members, numbers, colors, animals, classroom items, shapes and calendar-related items. There is a focus in learning about history and culture of Spanish-speaking people through activities that introduce different foods, festivals and traditions, with increased focus on correct pronunciation, vocabulary development, conversational and reading skills with the goal of establishing a strong base for further academic study.

Sixth through Eighth Grade: The Spanish curriculum in middle school provides support for the development of oral, written and reading comprehension, as well as introducing students to the history and culture of Spanish-speaking people. The emphasis is on using Spanish in a real context in conversation and genuine situations.  

Each class takes part in P.E. class twice per week for 45 minutes. 

Kindergarten through Second Grade: Students work on large/gross motor skills, a variety of sports skills, how to work as a team as well as learn about healthy living practices.

Third through Fifth Grade: Students work on basic motor skills such as running, jumping, kicking, catching and throwing, all of which are used in combination with aerobic activities and *lead-up games. Team games and sports are part of the curriculum.

Sixth through Eighth Grade: Team sports are taught through *lead-up games and simplified rules of the sports that require gross motor skills. Soccer, football, basketball, volleyball, baseball, track and field and speedball are used to teach skills and fundamentals. 

*Many students enjoy the game aspect of sports, but don’t enjoy practicing isolated skills. Typically, students become more interested in learning if they play in game-like scenarios. Therefore, lead-up games provide an opportunity for students to practice skills in a simulated game situation. The combination of games and drills provides optimal learning experiences for the students.